Torchwood
Amyris elemifera

Torchwood

Torchwood is native from Central to South Florida and the Keys along the East Coast. This is a Citrus relative and a larval food for both the giant swallowtail butterfly and the Schaus’ swallowtail butterfly. The latter is found in the Florida Keys.

The pea sized black berry has one seed and is a good source of food for birds in January and February. It can tolerate light frost and drought once established. The new trifoliate leaves are reddish, turning dark green and glossy at maturity.

Torchwood makes a great, free standing specimen in the front yard or can be mixed with other coastal shrubs. It goes well with Lignum Vitae, Bahama strongback, myrtle of the river, spicewood, gumbo limbo or most hammock species if given enough room to grow. Quailberry, beach Creeper and Coontie make beautiful groundcovers that will show off torchwood..